Tuesday, March 1

Some publications of the York Archeological Trust now downloadable for free

First of all, thanks to Katrin from A Stitch in Time for posting this link! If you're interested in medieval textiles and clothing, be sure to visit her blog.

The York Archeological Trust put some of their out of print publications online for free. You might be interested in the one below, and take look at their archive for more. I copied the abstract below from their website:
Link The Archaeology of York 17/15, Finds from Medieval York, Craft, Industry and everyday life by Patrick Ottaway and Nicola Rogers


This report is the definitive publication of some 6,000 objects made in a wide range of materials, including iron and non-ferrous metals, stone, glass and jet. They come from contexts dated to between c.1066 and 1600.

The first part of the report describes tools and implements, including those used in metalworking, leatherworking and textile manufacture. It also discusses the debris from craft activity, including a report on the analysis of non-ferrous metalworking waste at the Bedern Foundry and College sites. In addition, there is a full report on the metallurgy of seventeen iron knives to set alongside analyses of Anglian and Anglo-Scandinavian specimens from York.

The second part presents a wide range of objects, many of which were used on the sites where they were found. They provide a vivid insight into aspects of life as it was experienced in medieval York and include items of personal dress and clothing, jewellery, glass and other vessels, equipment for horse and rider, and a substantial assemblage of objects which illustrate the character of buildings, their fittings and furnishings.


I was particularly fascinated by this image of late 14th century double pointed knitting needles (p 2743, 2744):

Scans taken from The Archaeology of York 17/15, Finds from Medieval York, Craft, Industry and everyday life by Patrick Ottaway and Nicola Rogers


I tried some silk knitting last weekend, and I kept thinking of the quote" Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better." 1.9 mm needles definitely sound better than the 0.8 mm ones I was using!